[ARC Review] Paparazzi Princesses by Bria Williams & Reginae Carter (with Karyn Folan)

Paparazzi Princesses
Author: Bria Willams & Reginae Carter (with Karyn Folan)
Publisher: Cash Money Content
Publication Date: June 4th, 2013
Pages: 336 (Hardcover)
Genre: MG – Contemporary

Money and designer clothes. Fame and red carpet events. Front row concert tickets and expensive parties. 

That’s the good stuff . . . but being the daughter of a music mogul or a famous rapper isn’t easy. Step inside the lives of Kayla Jones and Promise Walker. As the daughters of two legends of rap music, trips, cash, designer labels and famous friends are just business as usual for Kayla and Promise. But so are the high expectations of super-successful parents, the drama of having two-faced friends, the not-always welcome glare of constant media attention and the hurt of nasty gossip. Add to that the ugly reality that some people would do anything to take their parents down—and Kayla and Promise face a daily struggle to figure out who to trust when everyone is blinded by their dad’s power. To make matters worse, sometimes, they’re not even sure of each other!

Review
You know, when I first read the synopsis for Paparazzi Princesses, I immediately thought of 52 Reasons to Hate My Father and how much I enjoyed that book. I’ve been wanting to read something light – basically not dystopia – and Paparazzi Princesses seemed right up my alley.

Paparazzi Princesses follows the story of Kayla and Promise as they face the challenges of being celebrities’ children. Told in Kayla’s and Promise’s point of views, at first I found it was easier to sympathize with Kayla. But as the story progresses and we get to know more of them, Promise grew on me and eventually I was rooting for her too. Their characters develop throughout the story and I liked that in the end they aren’t as shallow as they were in the beginning.

If only I could say the same about the supporting characters. Well, the parents are okay but I never liked Kayla’s friends and Promise’s too. They are annoying and they just wanna gain benefits from their friendship with the girls. Seriously, they’re the definition of fake friends. But that’s part of the girls’ challenges too and ultimately I was pleased with how Promise handles it. This book was predictable for me, but that doesn’t mean I didn’t enjoy it. I think it is well written and suitable for middle grade audience because the language choice isn’t that complicated and easy to devour.

Paparazzi Princess is a fairly enjoyable and drama-filled read that tackles the challenges of being celebrities’ kid, why it’s important to be honest and stay true to yourself and figuring out who to trust might not be easy.

Huge thanks to Simon & Schuster and Edelweiss for the opportunity to read and review this book!!

Rating:
3 Cakes!

5 comments

  1. This book doesn’t really look like my thing but I’m glad you enjoyed it! It’s also a good thing that both girls developed well throughout the course of the novel because shallow characters can be super annoying!

    Great review – thanks for sharing! ^.^

    Reply

  2. Oh I’m a massive Hollywood lover, celeb gossip and all that. So this looks like a good book to get me out of my reading slump.

    Reply

    1. I like those kinds of concept as well! I think they’re really fun. 🙂 I’ve been having a reading slump recently too… Hope you recover soon! 😀

      Reply

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